Lee Andreason

 

About

Lee Andreason is an internationally recognized sculptor and an avid horse woman; she is noted for her powerful bronze, cast stone and clay equine, figurative and mythological forms.  From early childhood, she has felt a keen awareness of the interconnectedness between nature and humanity.  Over the years, this sensibility has deepened and Andreason feels her role as an artist is to show humans their connection with nature.  She works to accomplish this role by depicting the essence of the spirit, beauty and power of each piece, portraying the soul of each subject.   “When I sculpt, I connect with the creative life force that gives energy to all of Nature.”

Incorporating her passionate love of horses, Andreason’s creative energy and professional focus has been dedicated to her sculpture for over twenty five years.  Her equine figures frequently depict ancient, mythological and war horses, embodying the power, grace and spirit of the horse.  A bronze of her portrayal of “Bucephalus”, the mighty war horse of Alexander the Great, was accepted at the American Academy of Equine Art’s 14th Annual Juried Exhibition at the Kentucky Horse park in Lexington Kentucky.  “Uma”, a piece inspired by the inner strength and integrity of the ancient Tang horses was accepted another year.  Some of her other pieces include bronzes of “Tonka” and “Dancing Pony”, both evoking the spirit of ancient Chinese horses. “Manifesting the sculpture ‘Avatar’ was a two year process of envisioning mans search for the higher essence of life”.   “Avatar” is a streamlined bronze of a supremely graceful horse with outstretched legs, firmly planted in earth and head reaching toward the heavens.

In Andreason’s figurative work of the human form, she usually works with live models and seeks to represent the higher aspects of the persona, be it femininity, masculinity, wisdom, grace, physical and spiritual strength.  “La Shiva” is an appeal to the universal woman, as the meditative and feminine.

Along with her extensive education in the arts, Andreason gained much of her knowledge from her mother, who was also an artist.  The influence of artists Moore, Zuniga, Marini, Picasso and Manzu have also played a powerful role in giving inspiration to her contemporary mythological images.

In 1999, she took a studio in Spain and divides her time between Europe and the US.  Her work has appeared in many one woman shows, nationally and internationally including Paris, Holland, Spain, and the United States.

Lee Andreason is an internationally recognized sculptor and an avid horse woman; she is noted for her powerful bronze, cast stone and clay equine, figurative and mythological forms.  From early childhood, she has felt a keen awareness of the interconnectedness between nature and humanity.  Over the years, this sensibility has deepened and Andreason feels her role as an artist is to show humans their connection with nature.  She works to accomplish this role by depicting the essence of the spirit, beauty and power of each piece, portraying the soul of each subject.   “When I sculpt, I connect with the creative life force that gives energy to all of Nature.”

Incorporating her passionate love of horses, Andreason’s creative energy and professional focus has been dedicated to her sculpture for over twenty five years.  Her equine figures frequently depict ancient, mythological and war horses, embodying the power, grace and spirit of the horse.  A bronze of her portrayal of “Bucephalus”, the mighty war horse of Alexander the Great, was accepted at the American Academy of Equine Art’s 14th Annual Juried Exhibition at the Kentucky Horse part in Lexington Kentucky.  “Uma”, a piece inspired by the inner strength and integrity of the ancient Tang horses was accepted another year.  Some of her other pieces include bronzes of “Tonka” and “Dancing Pony”, both evoking the spirit of ancient Chinese horses. “Manifesting the sculpture ‘Avatar’ was a two year process of envisioning mans search for the higher essence of life”.   “Avatar” is a streamlined bronze of a supremely graceful horse with outstretched legs, firmly planted in earth and head reaching toward the heavens.

In Andreason’s figurative work of the human form, she usually works with live models and seeks to represent the higher aspects of the persona, be it femininity, masculinity, wisdom, grace, physical and spiritual strength.  “La Shiva” is an appeal to the universal woman, as the meditative and feminine.

Along with her extensive education in the arts, Andreason gained much of her knowledge from her mother, who was also an artist.  The influence of artists Moore, Zuniga, Marini, Picasso and Manzu have also played a powerful role in giving inspiration to her contemporary mythological images.

In 1999, she took a studio in Spain and divides her time between Europe and the US.  Her work has appeared in many one woman shows, nationally and internationally including Paris, Holland, Spain, and the United States.